POWER IS being unapologetically me

An Interview with Rebekah Bruesehoff
LGBTQ+ advocate & wise beyond her years

Photographed in New Jersey by Maegen Dougherty

Rebekah advocates for the LGBTQ+ community in New Jersey in the pink canvas Champion

“I won’t be limited by any ideas of who people thought I was when I was born or who people think I should be now.”

Rebekah Bruesehoff is a lesson in finding and living your truth—one we wished we had learned at her young age (she’s only 13!). When we asked her what power means to her, she said it’s all about confidence, “Power is knowing who I am regardless of what anyone else says, being unapologetically me. It’s telling my story to other people.”

So, we’ll step back and let her do just that.

Rebekah Bruesehoff
“There’s power in not letting the world tell me or anyone else who we’re supposed to be.”

When I was born, everyone thought I was a boy but I know I’m a girl. This is who I am. I can be a girl that wears pink frilly dresses or the one covered in mud mountain biking. I can sing and act. I can also be amazing at math and science. I can be fierce on the field hockey field and graceful in ballet class. I can be a CEO or open my own bake shop. I won’t be limited by any ideas of who people thought I was when I was born or who people think I should be now.

I think there’s power in not letting the world tell me or anyone else who we’re supposed to be, how we’re supposed to act or dress, who we’re supposed to love, how we’re supposed to live. It’s not up them. It’s up to each of us.

Each of us gets to choose our own path, we choose how we want to show up in the world and be seen, and we choose what kind of impact we’re going to make. Will it be big or small? Will it be good or bad? It’s up to us.

Being a girl has nothing to do with how I act or what I wear. It’s who I am. It’s my identity. It’s just being me. Nobody else gets to tell me what that means. At the same time, my gender isn’t the most important thing about me—it doesn’t define me or limit me. It’s an awesome part of me, but it’s just one piece of the whole picture.

PHOTOGRAPHER SPOTLIGHT

Maegen Dougherty, New Jersey

Power is seeing the beauty.

“I document everything from once in a lifetime moments to an average family weekend at home. I get to show my clients a glimpse into their lives through my lens. I find power in helping people see through the imperfections and challenges in their lives to the beauty, magic, and wonder. I also find power in introducing people to others who are different from them, through my images, and showing how much we all have in common.”

Maegen Dougherty

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